RELATIONSHIP OF JOINT HYPERMOBILITY AND MUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS AND FREQUENCY OF BENIGN JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

Authors

  • Ahmad Usaid Qureshi
  • Abdul Maalik
  • Tahir Masood Ahmad

Abstract

Background: The majority of individuals with joint hypermobility remain asymptomatic. However,those associated with Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (BJHS), develop a number of systemicmanifestations. Our objective was to determine the relationship between joint hypermobility andmusculoskeletal problems, and frequency of BJHS in children and adolescents. Method: This crosssectional observational descriptive study was conducted at Outpatient Department, The Children’sHospital, Lahore, Pakistan. A total of 872 individuals (4–18 year) were examined for hypermobilejoints using Beighton score ≥4. A questionnaire was implied to get data regarding demographicprofile, musculoskeletal and extra-articular complaints, family history of joint problems and dailyactivity. Brighton’s criteria were implied for diagnosis of BJHS. Results: The frequency of jointhypermobility was 37.0%; male 39.5%, and female 34.2% (p=0.1). There was a gradual decline inmean Beighton score with age. The female population showed increase in mean Beighton scorearound 16–17 year age. Arthralgias and back pains 7.7% vs. 1.6%, (p<0.001), and hernias 2.5%(p=0.03) were significantly higher in individuals with joint hypermobility. History of joint problemsin the family was also significantly higher in children with joint hypermobility (p=0.01). BJHS wasdetected in 4.8% children (male 3.6% and female 6.3%, p=0.06). Arthralgias (51.0%), hernias(16.3%), joint dislocations (8.2%) and varicose veins (8.2%) were the most common presentations.Conclusion: BJHS is common among children. Arthralgias, back pains and hernias are significantlyhigher in these individuals.Keywords: Joint hypermobility, Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, musculoskeletalproblems, Children

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Published

2010-12-01