MALARIA ENDEMICITY EFFECT ON COVID-19 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY: AN IN-SILICO PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTION ANALYSIS

Authors

  • Shima Parsa Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Naser Hatami Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Alireza Sadeghinikoo Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Ahmad Abolghazi Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Navid Kalani Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Farshid Javdani Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Seyyed Abbas Hashemi Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari-Iran
  • Pouyan Keshavarz Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Afshin Avazpour Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran
  • Mehdi Forouzesh Legal Medicine Organization of Iran, Tehran-Iran
  • Alireza Doroudchi Legal Medicine Organization of Iran, Tehran-Iran
  • Mohammad Zarenezhad Legal Medicine Organization of Iran, Tehran-Iran

Abstract

The lower spread of COVID-19 in malaria endemic regions of world has been concluded in recent global COVID-19 data analysis. Scientists have compiled hypotheses about the relationships of these two infectious diseases; while some of those seem that have fully failed as malaria medications like Hydroxychloroquine were not effective in COVID-19 prevention. Our analysis of competition between ACE2 binding proteins as well as neutulizing SARS-Cov-2 antibodies revealed a similar structure to SARS-CoV-2 spike S1 protein in Plasmodium falciparum. Surprisingly, in an In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis, 20S proteasome alpha-4 subunit of Plasmodium falciparum had a better or equal binding affinity to ACE2 protein than SARS-CoV-2, based on a computational docking and MM/GBSA analysis. We hypothesized that prior encounter with Plasmodium falciparum in malaria endemic areas and the presence of asymptomatic variants of malaria in the body may render the human body to a competitive environment for SARS-CoV-2, as both infectious agents of malaria and SARS-Cov-2 may have a strong binding affinity to ACE2 protein.  Keywords: malaria; COVID-19; Protein-Protein Interaction; vaccination

Author Biographies

Shima Parsa, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Student Research Committee

Naser Hatami, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Student Research Committee

Alireza Sadeghinikoo, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Sport Medicine Center

Ahmad Abolghazi, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Department of Medical Parasitology

Farshid Javdani, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Student Research Committee

Seyyed Abbas Hashemi, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari-Iran

Department of Internal Medicine

Pouyan Keshavarz, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Student Research Committee

Afshin Avazpour, Research Center for social Determinants of Health, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom-Iran

Student Research Committee

Mehdi Forouzesh, Legal Medicine Organization of Iran, Tehran-Iran

Legal Medicine Research Center

Alireza Doroudchi, Legal Medicine Organization of Iran, Tehran-Iran

Legal Medicine Research Center

Mohammad Zarenezhad, Legal Medicine Organization of Iran, Tehran-Iran

Legal Medicine Research Center

Downloads

Published

2021-02-20